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Posted by on Sep 6, 2013 in Featured, Leadership, Recognition | 8 comments

3 Signs Members of Your Team Do Not Know How to Collaborate

collaboration post

Editor’s note: The following post was written by Anonymous. Ted merely facilitated the means to get the story out so that we all can learn from the person’s experience. You can see another article written by this same author HERE.

Collaboration is a great idea. In a collaborative environment good ideas and projects have the opportunity to become great ideas and projects. Working collaboratively people often come up with ideas that they wouldn’t have working alone – even with feedback from peers.

Unfortunately sometimes organizations talk about it but don’t support it, don’t hire people who can collaborate. Sometimes people who don’t know (or can’t) collaborate use “collaboration” to mask their inability or to just push their own agendas.  These are not simply collaboration styles. They may look like they are collaborating, but these colleagues or team members use the cover of collaboration to Do Things Their Way.

  1. Sitting in wait – this is the colleague who waits until you have done the bulk of work before contributing her criticisms.  This person makes you feel like you are sitting duck for criticism. Who wants to be the first to contribute when this colleague is waiting in the reeds? Not me.
  2. My Way – this colleague doesn’t work with you so much as dictate to you. Her way or no way style of collaborating kills any desire to work with her. Which is just what she wants: to take over the project.  This collaborator will toss endless spears of criticism that appear to be “contributing” but are really just designed to wear you out. So that you will relent and replace all of your work with hers. That’s a collaboration she can live with.
  3. Last Minute – You’ve done a lot of work on a project, made progress, dealt with colleagues sitting in wait, compromised and came up with new ideas that could not have emerged had you worked alone. Despite the challenges of collaborating, the project is on target to make its deadline. Until this collaborator shows or speaks up. At the last minute, this colleague brings up an idea, suggestion, or other contribution that is relevant, important, and interesting. But it is late in the game. Incorporating this piece requires the team to rework the entire project or deliverable. As a result, your team will not deliver on time. Every team member’s reputation and jobs is on the line.  Instead of focusing on improving the collaboration, the team is focused on the “quality vs “on-time”” debate.

Oddly enough, the traits that make a good leader also make a good collaborator: someone who listens to others, considerate, willing to do behind the scenes grunt work necessary to get a job done and polish someone else’s work so that everyone on the team shines. You may not force your ideas on everyone else but you know how to facilitate an environment in which good ideas become better and everyone contributes fairly without putting others on the team down.

The traits that make a good leader also make a good collaborator

  1. Define your terms. What does collaboration mean on your team or project?  What does this mean for evaluations and reviews? When you spell it out, you give less room to team members such as those described above who have trouble collaborating.
  2. Good fences make good collaboration. Sorry Robert Frost for hijacking your poem in the interests of business, but it endures well.  Fences in this case are boundaries – what are the deadlines for each phase of the project. Set recurring meeting times designated for working through ideas and suggestions. The sooner you collaborate within these boundaries, the less likely faux collaborators will be to disrupt the team and project.
  3. Designate times for disruptive ideas/thinking/work – Boundaries again, but in a way that uses fences to capture those really good ideas that may come from colleagues or staff who have trouble collaborating. These designated disruptive times gives them a place to stand in the spotlight.

Finally, as someone who wants to do things differently, who has the skills to collaborate, you must beware of these faux collaborators. That your company enables these faux collaborators to continue is often a red flag that the company talks about collaboration but really isn’t interested in rewarding it. It’s a red flag that you might be in a place that doesn’t value you.

 

Ted Coiné

Ted Coiné

Keynote speaker. Author of A World Gone Social: How Companies Must Adapt to Survive. Three-time CEO. Chairman and Founder of Switch and Shift. Ted Coiné is one of the most influential business experts on the Web, top-ranked by Forbes, Inc., SAP Business Innovation, and Huffington Post for his leadership, customer experience, and social media influence. Ted consults with owners, CEOs and boards of directors on making their companies more competitive by making them more human-focused. He and his family live in Naples, Florida.

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  • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

    Anonymous, you’re on a sinking ship! Get outta there, and bring your considerable talents somewhere that deserves you.

    To the rest of our community: this person is, indeed, about to jump ship for a vessel more deserving, as have maaaaaany of his/her most talented colleagues already. Are you running an organization that is driving away its top talent? Beware. You’ll be stuck with the leftovers. That will only hasten your company’s decline.

    Final note: I think leaders who have problems like this don’t read Switch and Shift. I’m wagging my finger at an empty room, I know ;) LOL. For the leaders who do love this humble corner of the Web… well, there’s tremendous opportunity in recruiting unappreciated or dissatisfied talent from your competitors. Happy hunting, my friends!

  • http://www.frymonkeys.com Alan Kay

    Ted, to quote my solution focus brief therapy teacher, Jim Duval, ‘Everybody is trying to collaborate … just not each other’s way’. Your contributor might want to try to reframe her/his understanding of the politics in their organization. That said, moving on to be even more successful somewhere else makes a lot of sense.

    • http://warrenwhitlock.com/social-media-expert Warren Whitlock

      I like the sound of that.

      Seems to me that collaboration is a group effort and hard to pin on one person. If the a team member doesn’t want to work with the team, then they aren’t a team member.

      • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

        Agreed, Warren. This particular place defines team as “the people reporting to the same boss.” I’ve noticed much more collaboration among the thought-leaders whose work is not stack-ranked against each others. To use a sports analogy, the receivers work very well with the quarterback and the offensive linemen, but not with the other receivers because success among them is zero-sum. It’s a pretty old-fashioned way of running an organization.

        • http://warrenwhitlock.com/social-media-expert Warren Whitlock

          you’re making my head hurt as I contemplate asking “can we eliminate all zero sum games?”

    • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

      I love your approach, Alan. I think the problem is, when management encourages jealousy instead of cooperation (through a culture of scarcity, where your work stack-ranked against mine even though we’re ostensibly on the same “team,” there is little will to open up and collaborate. Very 1950′s mentality at this place.

  • Pingback: 3 Signs Members of Your Team Do Not Know How to Collaborate from @TedCoine — Nothing But Excellence

  • CheryGegelman

    Ted – Thank you for sharing this post! This quote says it all, “That your company enables these faux collaborators to continue is often a red flag that the company talks about collaboration but really isn’t interested in rewarding it. It’s a red flag that you might be in a place that doesn’t value you.”

    • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

      Thanks Chery! Yes, I’m trying my best to gently encourage moving on before all the other talent is gone – you don’t want to be the one left turning off all the lights. Another top thought-leader just left last week. Time for a new CEO, methinks.

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