klout  kred antisocial

Klout And Kred Are AntiSocial. Opt Out With Me.

I opted out of Klout years ago. Before I was ever listed, ranked, or nominated by Forbes, Huffington Post Tech, The Shorty Awards – before any of that. Before landing a book contract for A World Gone Social. Before winning my first consulting gig for social media strategy, or giving my first keynote on the topic.

Are you with me? Having no score on Klout hasn’t slowed me down in any way.

You absolutely, thoroughly don’t need a Klout score either. In fact, I’m convinced that Klout is driving people and companies to engage in antisocial behavior in order to achieve a higher score in this ephemeral metric-measurer.* All this goes for Kred as well. Kred wasn’t around when I quit Klout. I’ve been paying attention to other stuff in the years since, like actually interacting with humans because as far as I can tell, that’s what puts the “social” into “social media.” All these metrics and scores and stuff… they make me want to take a shower.

I’m convinced that Klout is driving people and companies to engage in antisocial behavior in order to achieve a higher score in this ephemeral metric-measurer.

But today, I realized that I’m still listed on Kred, so I sent this tweet:

Hi @Kred. Could you please let me know how to opt out of your site altogether? I would like to not appear there, at all. Thanks!

Then I noticed that no one has tweeted from that account in two weeks, so… we’ll see how that goes. If I remember right, it took a week or two for Klout to allow me to quit – I made such a public campaign of it, and had so many people joining me and rooting me on, that it appeared like their clout was beginning to suffer – I truly think that’s why they finally let me out. Neither site makes it obvious how one quits. We’ll have to see how much of a struggle Kred is in this regard.

So what’s my beef? It comes down to one word: karma.

Be it Klout, Kred, or any other scoring system, if it rewards people for snubbing the little guy and sucking up to Twitter “whales,” there’s nothing okay about that. Last time I checked, the average Twitter account had about 280 followers. I absolutely don’t care. If you’re interesting and I’m online when you’re tweeting, I’ll interact. I’ll do this with one of my favorite authors of all time, Tom Peters (104,000 followers), and I’ll do it with a new friend I met in my stream recently, Copeland Richards (40 followers). Both are interesting people, and that is what I’m out to gain from our time online together: they make me think, or laugh, or best of all both at once.

How do you measure that? The very thought makes me throw up in my mouth a little.

They make me think, or laugh, or best of all both at once. How do you measure that? The very thought makes me throw up in my mouth a little.

How they Work

Just to wrap this up so you see my gripe with these “influence” measuring sites, here’s a little insight.

Kred published this scoring system right on their site:

  • Retweet or @reply by an @name that has less than 10,000 followers – 10 points
  • Retweet or @reply by an @name that has more than 10,000 followers – 25 points
  • Retweet or @reply by an @name that has less than 100,000 followers – 50 points
  • New follow from an @name – 1 point

They have similar rewards for Facebook, but you get the idea: if someone with more followers interacts with you, you are rewarded more than if someone with fewer followers does. In other words: be shallow, folks. Be very shallow.

Be it Klout, Kred, or any other scoring system, if it rewards people for snubbing the little guy and sucking up to Twitter “whales,” there’s nothing okay about that.

Klout is even worse, in that they won’t even tell you how they score “influence.” Instead, they just give you some vague guidelines. How you measure vague accurately is anyone’s guess. They have come under a lot of flack for completely overhauling their algorithm a few times, though, which to me says the previous scoring systems were all wrong. Maybe that’s just me. Anyway, my favorite Klout detractor is Jure Klepic. You can find his posts on the topic HERE.

Not with me? Lemme have it!

You are absolutely, completely, and utterly welcome to take me to task over this in the comments below. I enjoy when my readers agree with my writing, but it’s the disagreement that teaches me the most. So either way, let me know what you think of Klout, Kred, and the whole influence measuring industry that is growing up as we delve ever deeper into the Social Age.

*…And anyone who knows me knows what I think of metrics, which I sum up here: If It Can Be Measured, It Can Be Manipulated.

 

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Image credit: papobchote / 123RF Stock Photo

Keynote speaker. Author of A World Gone Social: How Companies Must Adapt to Survive. Three-time CEO. Chairman and Founder of Switch and Shift. Ted Coiné is one of the most influential business experts on the Web, top-ranked by Forbes, Inc., SAP Business Innovation, and Huffington Post for his leadership, customer experience, and social media influence. Ted consults with owners, CEOs and boards of directors on making their companies more competitive by making them more human-focused. He and his family live in Naples, Florida.

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

    • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

      Good job, George! Connections are absolutely the point, for sure. I’ll tell you, when I speak with someone (including some Social Media experts) who are all about the quick hit… well, all I can think is, good for you.

      I guess there’s room in the world for people with all sorts of motivations, including shallow ones. But there isn’t room in my own little corner of the world for those lost folks. I seek something deeper. Clearly, you do as well.

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

    • Rita Poynor

      Agree! But we can either choose to stink like piss–collecting anonymous followers. OR sweet smelling like expensive perfume (interact with our followers as individuals, not numbers).

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

    • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

      Rita and George, I love it! Granted, I’m chiming in here a day late (sorry!), and granted again, at least on Twitter, I’ve got a lot of “followers” (I like to think of them as friends, in the pre-Facebook sense of that word), but hoping that you two will forgive me for those facts, let me say this: I almost never even glance at a person’s numbers when I read their bio, which I do many times each day. All of which is to say, I’m firmly with you two. I don’t think anyone could fake interest in people – the actual, “who are you and what turns you on?” aspect of all sorts of people – for as long as I have. I just love people. And you know what? Even more than scorning those who don’t, I pity them. What a sad and empty life, to look at another and just see a dollar sign on their forehead, or a Klout score, or whatever it is some people see?

      What I do scorn, though, is any company that encourages such an outlook. That’s why I don’t just think the two companies mentioned above are silly wastes of time: I actually think they make the world a little bit worse of a place.

      Ahhhh. Thank you for letting me vent :)

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

  • http://www.lifeisntbroken.com lifeisntbroken

    I’m so thankful that I’ve been completely and utterly in the dark about interacting for points. Where’s the heart in that? I agree completely with your point of view. When we turn each other into a “stoking system” we perpetuate narcissism and narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing. I commend your integrity for opting out.

  • Dan Forbes

    I with you Ted. Can I get some points for joining you. LOL

  • Les

    Never bothered with klout, don’t know what it’s good for unless it makes you feel important.

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    • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

      You’re #1+ in my book, Dan! Keep it up!!

  • http://www.upost.it/ GeorgeSDK

    Completely agree Ted. Tried Klout for 15 minutes upon registration, then gave up – recently deleted my account. Of course my stats were awfully low, but just the idea of being obsessed with social media numbers makes me sick. Social media is about connections, for me.

  • Rita Poynor

    I think many prefer to remain “relationally anonymous” on social media sites. Posting and liking but rarely commenting on others posts or only engaging others when they have responded to one of their posts. It’s the numbers, not the conversation and genuine interest in others that guides the conversations and behavior on these sites. How many friends, followers do I have? How many likes, shares, comments, re-tweets? Sadly, as long as we use “numbers” to determine others value, the nameless faces in the crowd increase, along with the silence of sameness.

  • http://www.rebelbrown.com Rebel Brown

    Where oh Where is the LOVE BUTTON for this post Ted. You are SO RIGHT ON… I opted out of Klout a few years ago when I realized that most highly rated folks were also folks who had bought 1000s of followers and actually gamed the system to show stats – using automation and people HIRED to create their online persona and posts. Many of these supposed “leaders” were also the same people I was warned to stay away from, in private DMs. For example, there’s the “leadership gooroo” who has a super high Klout score – and who is also well known for stealing money once you give her your credit card. Or the Marketing gooroo who has stolen content from me and at least 6 other people I know. These and other who folks have high Klout scores also show their cocky selves in their posts AND in their interaction only with those who can help their personal agenda. This kind of misbehavior is rampant on SoMe – something you and I have chatted about often. WHY do some people turn into cheating predators behind that avatar? I’m so DONE with the BS. SoMe has changed for me as a result. Thats one reason Im so blessed to be part of the Switch and Shift movement – real people for real people. Like you – I’ve shunned Klout and for the time I do spend on SoMe these days – I focus on the Human Side in all its glory!

  • http://www.rebelbrown.com Rebel Brown

    By the way, I wish I had $10 for every person whose vehemently tried to rationalize buying followers and automating massive streams of content. The gist of their logic? “I have to have the Klout scores and followers to get business from corporations as a social media expert.” Say What? Cheating and cheating some more is how you become a SoMe expert? Something in that logic is just plain WRONG.

  • Pingback: Klout And Kred Are AntiSocial. Opt Out With Me | AlainBKK()

  • http://www.martingysler.com Martin Gysler

    I agree with your analysis Ted. Even if you’re right, I think it does not make a difference if we’re on Klout, Kred or other platforms in the same style or not. What matters is how we interact on social media. If someone does not want to interact with a person, because it has few followers or a small Klout score, that person, in my opinion, has not a great value anyway.

  • http://cocreatr.typepad.com CoCreatr

    When I first found my listing on Klout few years ago, it had associated me with the people I least intended to follow, among them a stalker. Opted out in a hurry. Hope it stays put.

  • http://quickmeups.com/ Zachary @zacharykreid

    Great article and viewpoint Ted. In my humble opinion we should be using the advances in worldwide communication to connect with MORE people, not cherry pick and be egotistical about our interaction. I think these can be the greatest vehicles we’ve seen to create COMMUNITY and help others out. I intend to use these platforms as such. Thanks for being a voice of reason in a world full of shouting. Take care!

  • laurirottmayer

    I’m so with you on this and I didn’t want to comment until after I deactivated my account again. You see, I believe the same way you do and have also written a couple of blog posts about it. But I am speaking today at the Social Media Tulsa conference. I’ll be speaking about the Social CV. Before I dismissed out of hand the influence scores, I wanted to use Klout again for a bit to see what it was that made it so great. One of my friends said, Oh, I get some great perks. But honestly, I got two of those in the two months I had my profile back and they just don’t stack up to what I get with no klout. So last night, I mentioned to one of my fellow speakers that I didn’t care for klout and this person said, “Well, you kind of have to use it.” And I asked, “What for?” and this person didn’t really have an answer. As soon as I rehearsed my talk for the last time, I deleted my Klout profile again. I’m no one’s mean girl and having one just seemed disingenuous to me. Oh, and I like the sad monster they have now on my disabled page. It’s more like me than the sad puppy that used to be there. ;-) Great post, Ted!

  • Pingback: Intellectual Transcendence and Entrepreneurial Opportunity Part 3: Honing Your Empathy | The NICE Reboot: A Guide to Becoming a Better Female Entrepreneur- How to Balance Your Craving for Humanity and Technology in Today’s Startup Culture, by Penina Ryb()

  • http://www.upost.it/ GeorgeSDK

    Truly, but who pays attention to someone who doesn’t have these? Social media is a pissing contest like no other. (sorry for the expression!)

  • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

    Dan, I’m gonna give you 100 Good Karma points for that ;)

  • Dan Forbes

    Goodie, goodie. I hope I’m #1 now.

  • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

    You know, I couldn’t have said it any better: “narcissism is alive and well without any nurturing.” I don’t know if I’m driven by integrity so much as peeve, but thank you :)

  • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

    God going, Les. Keep with that. I don’t have a better answer than what you just said.

  • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

    Thanks for the love, Reb – you brought a huge smile to my face. And “gooroo.” That’s my new spelling for that word. Brilliant.

    There are predators everywhere people gather, unfortunately. Bernie Madoff may have grabbed headlines, but I believe only because of the scale of his crimes, not because they’re so unique. I hate to sound like a scold, but the idea of using the stock market as a gambling den rather than a place to buy portions of companies has never sat right with me – I guess that would be Madoff versus Buffett, gamble for a quick hit versus invest for the long haul, to actually build something and add value to these companies, thus adding value to the world. Oiy. (By the way, “Mad…off?” “Made Off?” There’s a hint, folks!)

    As I often say, my mentor Bernie Turner of Walden University’s advice has made all the difference to me: “Stand for something important. You’ll be amazed at the caliber of people you attract.” People like you, Reb. Like the rest of our League, our guest contributors, and (I’m proud to say) our community of readers/watchers/listeners. I really think we repel as many crapy people as we attract honest ones – and that, I believe, is how you build a lasting community of purpose that can truly change the world!

  • http://quickmeups.com/ Zachary @zacharykreid

    Great insight Rebel, I like that line of thinking. Have found you on Twitter and will be connecting. Take care!

  • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

    Thank you! How does that work for them? They snow a corporate CMO and land the business, and then… how do they perform? No wonder so many business leaders feel Social is a frivolous waste of time, money, and effort with no ROI. They’ve been burned.

    Buyer beware? I guess so, huh? When I speak with leaders about bringing me in to build their social strategy (or any other service I provide, for that matter), I’ll tell them right up front: “This is where I can help you, this is where I can’t. I can bring in people for the latter to round out my deficits, or you can. Up to you.” This way when I actually do the work, I don’t feel like a fraud who’s waiting to get caught, and the client ends up psyched they found me – so psyched that they recommend me to their friends. I don’t care what product or service you provide, that’s how you build a thriving business! …All of which you know, of course, or we wouldn’t be in each other’s Mutual Admiration Society ;)

  • Rita Poynor

    Agreed! It’s good to know that there are people on social media who see it from a relational perspective, not a profit perspective. People are emotionally starving today. Let’s use social media for good and genuinely interact with one another. Have a wonderful week Ted!

  • Rita Poynor

    Agreed! It’s good to know that there are people on social media who see it from a relational perspective, not a profit perspective. People are emotionally starving today. Let’s use social media for good and genuinely interact with one another. Have a wonderful week Ted!

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