Millennials Really Are Different. Here’s Why…

I know, I know: every new generation to hit the workforce is special, dynamic, and above all, different! Every new generation has its own particular reasons for being “The Generation” that will rewrite how business is done.

And I know, I know, I know: every new generation is lazy, and spoiled, and feels entitled, and has to be broken in like a colt; useless to anyone until it learns to accept a saddle and hunker down for serious work.

I know, folks. Some people hold that the youth is our future. And isn’t that special?

Others opine that same youth is our future, so we’re really screwed.

Either way you slice it, this generalization of the next generation has been going on in the press and in our imaginations forever, probably. I’ll bet the Egyptians have hieroglyphics on the topic.

On the one hand, I’m inclined to say to the grownups around me, “Guys, seriously? You do this every few years. You prognosticated on how weird or wonderful we plaid-clad Gen X-ers were. ‘Slackers’ you called us.”

Fast forward twenty-some years and now look at us. We’re just people, with more in common with older and younger people in our socioeconomic classes and professions, often than with our own fellow graduates.

However, I can’t say that about the Millennials, much as I’d like to. Think about what these kids have gone through. Economically, their charge out of school and into the workforce has been metaphorically reminiscent of a past generation’s charges across “No Man’s Land” in the battlefields of France in WWI.

This generalization of the next generation has been going on in the press and in our imaginations forever, probably. I’ll bet the Egyptians have hieroglyphics on the topic.

The present day youth has been mowed down, by far the biggest victims of unemployment and under-employment in the Great Recession.

Yet while comparison to the Lost Generation of a century ago might be colorful, it’s not what I see when I look at the young women and men of the Millennial generation. Instead, I see strong similarity to the kids of the 1930’s, who grew up to be our Greatest Generation.

Fast forward twenty-some years and now look at us. We’re just people, with more in common with older and younger people in our socioeconomic classes and professions, often than with our own fellow graduates.

Doubt me? I completely understand your inclination. That’s why I invite you to click over to YouTern now, to read my guest-post there that went live this morning. And after you’ve read it, please, let me have it in the comments – or share it with your friends and colleagues.

Either way, I hope you spend some time on our sister site. YouTern is as dedicated to The Human Side of Business as we are here at Switch and Shift.

Their CEO, Mark Babbitt, is a Leaguer here at S&S, a mentor, and a good friend to Shawn and me. Their Content and Community Manager, Dave Ellis, is our heroic Senior Editor, and also our good friend.

And, if you are in HR, recruiting, or if you yourself are a young careerist… you might want to set YouTern as your home page.

 

Art by: MattyYoung1234

Ted Coiné is a Forbes Top 10 Social Media Power Influencer and an Inc. Top 100 Leadership and Management Expert. This stance at the crossroads of social and leadership put him in a unique perspective to identify the demise of Industrial Age management and the birth of the Social Age. The result, after five years of trend watching, interviewing and intensive research, is his latest book, A World Gone Social: How Companies Must Adapt to Survive, which he co-authored with Mark Babbitt. An inspirational speaker and popular blogger, Ted is a pioneer of the Human Side of Business (#humanbiz) movement. He is also a serial business founder and three-time CEO. When not speaking at conferences and corporate functions, Ted advises CEOs on how to become Truly Social Leaders, or “Blue Unicorns” as they put it in A World Gone Social, in order to bring their companies into the Social Age. Ted’s advice: “Change is only scary if it’s happening to you. Instead, bring the change your competitors dread. That is something only a Social Age business leader can accomplish.”

  • PeterPrasad SF

    Socrates bemoaned the youth of Athens.  The human spirit remains the renewable energy of dear sweet planet Earth. 

  • http://warrenwhitlock.com/social-media-expert Warren Whitlock

    Even more predictable about special generations is the comment “but this time it’s different ”

    Always a popular and important topic. None less so if called special :)

  • http://www.savvycapitalist.blogspot.com TedCoine

    Too true!

  • footer-logo

    There’s a more human way to do business.

    In the Social Age, it’s how we engage with customers, collaborators and strategic partners that matters; it’s how we create workplace optimism that sets us apart; it’s how we recruit, retain (and repel) employees that becomes our differentiator. This isn’t a “people first, profits second” movement, but a “profits as a direct result of putting people first” movement.

  • Contact Us



    email: connect@switch&shift.com
    1802 North Carson Street
    Suite 206
    Carson City, NV 89701


    Terms & Conditions  |  Privacy Policy

  •  

    three − = 0