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Posted by on Apr 19, 2013 in Culture, Featured, HR | 2 comments

Slow and Steady Loses Every Time

slow and steady text

JayThe world of work is moving at the speed of light. Or at least it feels that way for me. The work life balance discussion doesn’t seem to stop, but quite frankly I don’t think many of the uber rich outside of Silicon Valley are listening.

That means the pressure is on more than ever for those who are gainfully employed to continue to produce in an environment where so many talented people are waiting to jump at the chance to join your team ( read here -> in your job.)

Perhaps the corporate world is sending a nonstop message that tells us to be ultra-competitive in order to drive profit margins, achieve world-class status or consistently be first to market with the latest product or idea.

Maybe I’m contributing to this message?

Speed of Work

I’ve recently started referring to the pace of the workload and projects my team is expected to survive…er…perform at as the speed of our work. I’m still unsure if I’m being arrogant in thinking that we are expected to perform at a higher level than most; or, if we are in fact operating most days at a different level.

The pressure is on more than ever… to continue to produce in an environment where so many talented people are waiting to jump at the chance to join your team ( read here -> in your job.)

Quite honestly I’m inclined to believe it’s the latter of the two.

The obvious question which follows is whether or not work is supposed to look and feel this way? Is post-recession society (barely) simply moving so fast that leaders like me have come to believe that the speed of work for the foreseeable future must be sustained at a blistering pace?

Is the world of work just a corporate game of survival of the fittest…or fastest? I’m not so sure maintaining a nonstop pace in  any activity is sustainable, let alone in the workplace.

There is no option but to stop making excuses, and pick up your pace.

No Option

Now is the perfect time to discuss how HR can change the culture of the organization to help bring balance to a chaotic world. But I’m not going down that path. Work is hard, and there seems to be a heck of a lot of it to do these days.

“I think HR has an opportunity to help source high performing employees, support them as they get up to speed, and make sure those that are dragging down your organization have an opportunity to anchor another company’s slow decline.”

There is no option but to stop making excuses, and pick up your pace.

How About You

Too much time is wasted complaining about workloads, balance, piles of paperwork, meetings, email, and on and on.

Yes, we have a long list of tasks to complete and email to read. Download an app or two to make yourself more efficient, get organized, and pick up the pace.

I’d love to hear from you.

No Excuses.

For this post,  Switch and Shift thanks our friends at NoExcusesHR!

 

Art by: H3AD3AD

 

Jay Kuhns

HR VP, husband and father who gets fired up about speaking, blogging, healthcare, doing HR differently, social media, coffee and hockey. No Excuses!

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  • Mic

    Too much time may be wasted “complaining about workloads, balance, piles of paperwork, meetings, email, and on and on.” But too little time is spent by hiring and promoting competent leaders that know how to communicate with their staff. Too little time is spent analyzing what a reasonable workload should be for a person in a given role. Too little time is spent understanding the importance for people to have a life outside of work and that, by doing so, will be happier and more productive (and more likely to stick around) at work. Too little time is spent realizing that many of the meetings people have in corporate situations aren’t necessary. Too little time is spent training managers how to manage people. Too little time is spent looking at the workload of a person or team and figuring out how to do it more efficiently. Too little time is spent investing in technology infrastructure that can make work more efficient. Too little time is spent actually talking to employees to understand what their individual motivations and goals are. Too little time is spent on creating and changing culture. Too little time is spent realizing that a culture stuck in 1990 doesn’t work today. Too little time is spent on firing people, starting at the top, that are in the way and prevent progress and growth in the organization. “Pick up the pace” is a grossly oversimplified “solution” to the issues that many organizations face. Their problem is they haven’t honestly looked in the mirror for years…sometimes decades. Ignoring these issues is a recipe for failure and the repeating the same mistakes.

  • http://www.facebook.com/gary.keil.35 Gary Keil

    I think I agree with most of this…  Life is “like the Starship Enterprise using Magellan’s navigational system” – we’re busting out at light speed with very little understanding what is just ahead.  This doesn’t mean we should not be venturing out, we should, but we are well served to  take stock of where the heck we’re heading!!??

    A different thought that should add to the article is the fact that there are big differences between having a job, a career or a calling.  The first two short sell ourselves as well as the particular business we may find ourselves in.  Being ultracompetitive and outperforming others is critical for success in those arenas (so I agree with Jay here).  IF, however, we are performing our calling we are absolutely unique and no one can compete with us – we are the only one who can bring the unique compilation of skills and passion and purpose to the table.  I think the probability of survival in any job or career is extremely low, regardless if you’re moving at the speed of light, or if you think your fitness or fastness will keep you on top.  The probability of survival is 100% if your survival depends on your level of happiness (or sense of purpose/meaning).

    The main thing HR should be focusing on (in the name of any ‘business’) is developing a culture of purpose?

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