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Posted by on Nov 28, 2013 in Business, Featured, Inspirational, Leadership, Strengths | 1 comment

The Importance of Grace to Leadership

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Give us grace and strength to forbear and to persevere. Give us courage and gaiety and the quiet mind, spare to us our friends, soften to us our enemies - Robert Louis Stevenson

Honoring the calling of leadership is to experience the joys and agony in work and in life. Wrapped in that honor and guiding your responses to people and circumstances is grace: considerate and thoughtful response or action no matter the person or circumstance.

Grace allows you to remain calm when it’s easier to be angry.

Grace allows you to be still to hear and learn what is and isn’t being said.

Grace strengthens your actions to remain true to your leadership philosophy and to humanity without selling out.

Grace helps you to be humble.

Grace guides you to treat people as people.

If ever there is a time where we need more grace in your leadership it is today.

Businesses today may be suffering, but it’s your graceful leadership that can help to reverse the unsatisfying din echoing throughout today’s work environments.

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Image credit- imanolqs / 123RF Stock Photo

 

Shawn Murphy

Change Leader | Speaker | Writer Co-founder and Co-CEO of Switch and Shift. Passionately explores the space where business & humanity intersect. Promoter of workplace optimism. Believes work can be a source of joy. Top ranked leadership blogger by Huffington Post.

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  • Charles Sansom

    A teacher once wrote that with horror he realized that he had the absolute power to make a child’s life as great as it could be, or as horrible as it could be, because of his authority. In this day and age of “It’s all about me,” it’s good to see that there are others that can realize this about authority and write pretty much the same thing, though in different words.