Entering the Shift Age: The End of the Information Age and the New Era of Transformation

Your Decisions Reveal Who You Are, and What You Value

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When you make a decision, it results in an action. And the accumulation of those decisions and actions become how people describe you and think of you. This becomes your “story.”

  • What story are the collective decisions of your organization telling your customers, employees, and the marketplace?
  • What is important to you?
  • Do your decisions reflect what you intended and what your company stands for?

Getting customers to love you begins with how you consider the people impacted by your decisions.

You tell customers every day how much you honor them by the way you direct decisions in one direction or another. And that’s what they play back to the masses. That’s what shows up on the Internet.

 

You tell customers every day how much you honor them by the way you direct decisions

 

For more information, see my blog post on Driving Culture Change in Chief Customer Officer 2.0. The post provides profiled decisions made by beloved companies of every size and across many industries that earned the right to their customers’ stories. They are called “beloved companies” because of the emotional attachment customers have to them.

Here are a few recent profiles:
What Defines Your Experience?
Are You Remembered for Being There?
Do You Accept Accountability When Things Go Wrong?
Is Your Trusting Cup Half Full or Half Empty?

Beloved companies are acutely aware that their experience impacts how customers feel and respond. They take the time to make purposeful decisions about the contacts with customers. Beloved companies actively decide to connect who they are as individuals with the decisions they make in how to run their business.

 

Beloved companies are acutely aware that their experience impacts how customers feel and respond

 

Common to beloved companies is the concentration, angst, and passion that they put into decision-making. Suspending their fear that the dollars and cents won’t come swiftly enough, beloved companies decide to run their businesses with what each of us learned as kids – the Golden Rule.

The decisions we make in our business lives measure the depth of our humanity – our ability to apply that simple Golden Rule.

  • How we choose to correct something that goes wrong
  • How steadfast we are in delivering the goods and ensuring quality
  • How we give employees what they need to enable them do the right thing for customers

All these decisions expose what a company values. And the actions that tumble from these decisions expose the kind of people we are.

Think about how you experience companies throughout your life as both customer and employee.

  • Why do you feel so connected to some and distanced from others?
  • How does your feeling about a company relate to your natural desire to follow the Golden Rule?
  • When a company makes genuine attempts to do the right thing, does this draw you to them?

 

Art by Jonas Ranum Brandt

Jeanne Bliss is not an evangelist or observer of companies; she is a customer experience expert As the Customer Leadership Executive for five large U.S. market leaders, Jeanne fought valiantly to get the customer on the strategic agenda, redirecting priorities and creating transformational changes to the brands’ customer loyalty. She has driven achievement of 95 percent loyalty rates, changing customer experiences across 50,000-person organizations. Jeanne developed her passion for customer loyalty at Lands’ End, Inc., where she reported to the company’s founder and executive committee as leader for the Lands’ End customer experience. She was Senior Vice President of Franchise Services for Coldwell Banker Corporation. Jeanne served Allstate Corporation as its chief officer for customer loyalty & retention. She was Microsoft Corporation’s General Manager of Worldwide Customer & Partner Loyalty. At Mazda Motor of America she initiated the brand’s retention effort. After 25 years as the Customer Experience Executive in five major US Corporations, Jeanne founded CustomerBliss in order to create clarity and an actionable path for driving the customer loyalty commitment into business operations.

  • reply Joseph Lalonde ,

    Jeanne, I enjoyed reading your post. And your point about giving the employee what they need to serve the customer is paramount to showing the customer you value them. Why make them wait for a determination? Why make them uncomfortable and have to face someone else? It’s all in empowering others to take care of the customer.

    • reply Your Decisions Reveal Who You Are, and What You Value | People Discovery ,

      [...] See on switchandshift.com [...]

      • reply Customer Service Is Head & Shoulders Above When You’ve Got Their Back! | Switch and Shift ,

        [...] Want more? The customer service series continues here: Your Decisions Reveal Who You Are and What You Value  [...]

        • reply Jeanne Bliss ,

          Joseph
          Thanks for letting me know that this message connected with you!

          It is the deliberate-ness of decision making inside these companies that really sets them apart. They put an intense amount of angst proactively into deciding how they will (and will not) treat customers and employees. I’m still amazed after all these years, how few companies do this.

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